• About us

    About us

    Welcome to the East Northport Jewish Center. We are a Conservative, egalitarian synagogue of approximately 300 families. We are truly multi-generational; our youngest members are infants, our oldest are in their nineties. On any Shabbat, you can find three generations of the same family in our pews. Read More
  • Family Bowling

    Family Bowling

    Come to Larkfield Lanes on Sunday, January 29th, for this Men's Club sponsored annual event. Read More
  • Scout (and Birthday) Shabbat

    Scout (and Birthday) Shabbat

    It's not only a Birthday Shabbat, but our congregant Boy and Girls Scouts are invited to come and participate in our Friday evening services! Wear your uniform and receive a patch! Read More
  • World Wide Wrap

    World Wide Wrap

    The World Wide Wrap unites men, women and children in prayer. Learn about the mitzvah of tefillin on February 5th at 9:00 am. Read More
  • Tot Shabbat

    Tot Shabbat

    What could be more fun? Join other families with young children in bringing in Shabbat with songs, stories and fun– Read More
  • Tu B'Shevat Seder

    Tu B'Shevat Seder

    Join us for a special ecological seder that reminds Jews of our connection to the earth and to our role as caretakers of the environment. Read More
  • Play Wallyball!

    Play Wallyball!

    No experience necessary- all levels of athleticism welcomed! Have a fun while you get some exercise, join friends, and have a nosh afterward Read More
  • Buy a Brick

    Buy a Brick

    Honor or memorialize a loved one, commemorate a special event, mark your years of ENJC membership, give a lasting and meaningful gift. Your brick or bench will be a part of a beautiful new outdoor seating area, to be enjoyed by all our members and guests. You can place your order by clicking below. Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8

Leadership

  • Ian Silverman, Rabbi
  • Ralph P. Nussbaum, Cantor
  • Eric Loring, ENJC President

rabbi10View current news articles, commentary, videos and more that have an impact on Jewish culture, politics and religion at Rabbi Silverman's Sites to See

In our contemporary American milieu, we begin January as a new chapter, with a batch of resolutions for the New Year. Similarly, with the departure of our beloved Chazzan, we at ENJC are also beginning a new chapter. And, according to Jewish tradition, every day is an opportunity for a new chapter, a potential for teshuva–a return to the correct path and to good living. Even God starts a new chapter each day, as the siddur claims, Hamechadesh bechol Yom Maaseah beresheet–we are awestruck at our God who each day 'creates the world anew.' With this in mind, there are four resolutions we can adopt into our Jewish lives, based on major themes in the portions we read in each of our January Shabbats. Perhaps you will embrace all or some of these opportunities.


In Miketz, which we read on December 30th, Joseph is appointed vizier of Egypt and devises a way to save the Near East from drought and hunger. Through his foresight and vision, suffering is alleviated and lives are saved. Let’s resolve, this new year, to make certain to redouble our efforts in supporting major organizations like Mazon, and make a personal effort to combat hunger by working with HIHI and with Long Island Harvest soup kitchens and food pantries, so as to minimize hunger for those who live locally.


In Vayigash, read on January 7, Joseph recognizes the repentance and improvement in his brothers, and reveals that he is their long-lost brother and that they must stop beating themselves up for past wrongdoings against him. Similarly, in our lives, we may have run-ins and moments of disagreement that turn ugly. This year, can't we perhaps turn to a loved one and forgive? Can't we gain a new perspective and maturity for a feud for which we may not even remember its' origin? Years may go by and affection may grow colder. Instead, love and let live. Forgive and forget. Reveal your real face to family and friends–a face that seeks to embrace rather than to estrange.


In Vayechi, which we read on January 14, we see an acme of pure love in the behavior of one of Jacob's grandsons, Menasseh, when he receives a lesser blessing from his grandfather than his younger brother, Ephraim. Jacob crosses his arms and knowingly puts his right hand on the head of Ephraim, even though he is the younger, saying that the younger brother will be greater than the elder Menasseh. In fact, the entire book of Genesis is about the jealousy of brothers: Cain and Abel, Ishmael and Isaac, Jacob and Esau Joseph and his brothers.  But Menasseh isn't jealous. He is happy for his brother. That is why, on Friday night, we bless our sons to be like Menasseh and Ephraim. These brothers broke the cycle of envy. May we resolve this year to break our cycle of envy, and when we catch ourselves coveting the blessings of others, let's make sure to count the many that we have.


On January 21, we read from the portion of Shemoth. We are introduced to Moses, who runs away from Egypt as a fugitive, and assumes the role of a shepherd. Moses needs to be convinced that he can be so much more. Yet he resists his calling and his talents, not believing in himself. God puts a staff in his hand and says, "Just do it." Moses finds his stride, and boy does he. This might be a lesson for all of us who are perfectionists or are too hard on ourselves. This year don't talk yourself out of trying for a new level of achievement, a new skill, or a new hobby. Don't settle for the familiar. Bring it on. You may fail but you have to believe in yourself and make that effort. You, like Moses, might surprise yourself with your talents if you do!

Read More

nussbaum

Our dear Cantor Nussbaum has retired as of December 31, 2016. The past quarter century under Cantor Nussbaum represents a time of special friendship and spirituality with our congregation, its leadership, teachers and faculty, and the many students he has touched throughout the years. The East Northport Jewish Center wishes him, Avrille and their family all the best– a long and joyous retirement. We are profoundly grateful for the priviledge to have been enriched by his presence among us. 

Read More

EricLoringIt is a new year, a time of new beginnings! I hope that everyone had a lovely Chanukkah. As everyone knows, Cantor Nussbaum is now retired. He and Avrille are making arrangements to move closer to their family in New Jersey. He is extremely appreciative of the love and support he has received.

A lot has been happening over the last couple of months, so I would like to give an update of where we stand. We have hired Eliza Zipper as Religious School principal. She is a graduate of the Davidson School at Jewish Theological Seminary and has many years of experience as a Jewish educator and youth leader. She brings a great deal of energy and excitement about Jewish education. We look forward to working with her.

Also in the Religious School, we have hired Rabbi David Shain as the Hay Prayer and Hebrew Skills teacher. Those of you who have spent time at Gurwin may be familiar with Rabbi Shain, who has served there as a mashgiach (kashrut supervisor) and their Shabbat Rabbi. Rabbi Shain is very personable and knowledgeable. I am confident that our Hay students are in good hands.

Turning our attention to B’nai Mitzvah preparation, we have hired Dr. Paul Kaplan, a former long-term congregant, to tutor our B’nai Mitzvah students. Dr. Kaplan is a retired college professor with decades of teaching experience. In addition, in his own words, he has prepared “a thousand students” for their Bar and Bat mitzvah including at least one member of our Board of Directors. We are lucky to have him on board.

Finally, the Cantor Search committee has been meeting regularly since mid-November. With input from the Board and committees, a job description for our Cantor position has been developed. We have submitted our job posting to the Cantor Assembly Placement Office and we have begun to receive applications. It is still very early in the process, but we are on course and schedule. Look for future updates as things develop.

Shalom, chaverim! See you in shul!

Read More

Services

  • This Week

Week of Monday, January 23

Monday – Thursday
Evening minyan – 8:15 pm

Friday, January 27
Evening Service – 7:30 pm
Special Person Shabbat

Saturday, January 28
Shabbat Service – 8:45 am
Family Service – 10:30 am

Sunday, January 29
Morning minyan – 9:00 am
Evening minyan – 8:15 pm

 

 

Find us on

  

 

Read More

Order Your Shalach Manot Baskets

ShalachManot 

 

The ENJC Celebrates Chanukah 2016

Candlelighting

Contact Us

The East Northport Jewish Center
328 Elwood Road
East Northport, NY, 11731  

Phone: 631-368-6474
Fax: 631-266-2910
Religious School Office: 631-368-6474

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Religious School: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

        

Upcoming Events

Donate to ENJC

healthcare jobs washington dc

levitra uk

atrium pharmacy

doxycycline online

harmony korine drugs

levaquin online

prescription medication for leg cramps

buy tetracycline online

pills for a bigger booty

buy azithromycin online

metanx prescription

viagra

priority health insurance

dapoxetine uk online

google android 2.2 tablet

phentermine 37.5 mg

i need a doctor song

adderall online without a prescription

water pill for high blood pressure

lorazepam online

naturopathic doctor schools

ostaa viagra