• Welcome to the ENJC

    Welcome to the ENJC

    The ENJC is a Conservative, egalitarian synagogue of approximately 300 families. We are truly multi-generational; our youngest members are infants, our oldest are in their nineties. On any Shabbat, you can find three generations of the same family in our pews. We offer something for everyone by meeting our members' needs for spiritual, cultural and social connection to the Jewish people. We are known as the “haimish shul,” so visit and spend a Friday evening or Shabbat morning with us and see for yourself!
  • Help Those in Need

    Help Those in Need

    Contribute food, prepare and/or serve, or make a donation on Wednesday, December 26, from 4:45-8:30 pm at Temple Beth El, Park Avenue, Huntington.
  • Tot Shabbat for our Youngest Congregants

    Tot Shabbat for our Youngest Congregants

    Bring your kids/grandkids for an informal and fun Shabbat experience, filled with stories, singing, dancing and praying. Meet new families!
  • Hebrew Reading Course

    Hebrew Reading Course

    Learn or sharpen your Hebrew, from Aleph to Tav, in a 5-SESSION COURSE, Tuesdays from 7:15-8:15 pm: January 8, January 22, January 29, February 5 and February 26. Enrich your Jewish identity, participate more fully in our prayer services, and be an example to your children and grandchildren. RSVP by calling the synagogue office, 631-368-6474 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Torah Study with Rabbi Ian

    Torah Study with Rabbi Ian

    Join us after services on Saturday morning, January 12, as we discuss Parashat Bo, in which we learn of the final three plagues upon the Egyptians. The Israelites left Egypt, heading toward the land of milk and honey, and received the commandment to observe Passover.
  • Join us for a Pancake Breakfast

    Join us for a Pancake Breakfast

    The ENJC is holding a Pancake Fundraiser! Join us Sunday, January 13, during the hours of 8:30 - 11:30 am for pancakes, fruit, juice, coffee and tea. Adults: $10, Kids under 12: $5. Please RSVP by January 8 to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Czech Torah Webpage Project

    Czech Torah Webpage Project

    As owners of a Czech Torah Scroll, the ENJC joins a community of over 1000 scroll-holders around the world. These scrolls miraculously survived the Shoah and were brought to London in 1964. On Tuesday evening, February 5, 2019 our scroll will be a part of the first gathering and procession of Czech scrolls at Temple Emanu-El in New York City. Read of the history of the ENJC Czech scroll by clicking on the Read More button. Read More
  • Rabbi Silverman's Adult Education Course

    Rabbi Silverman's Adult Education Course

    Derekh eretz is the code of behavior that binds us to each other as human beings and as Jews. It means acting decorously and with respect toward all. Students explore the development of morality as a key component to holiness and how it becomes a fundamental value in Judaism in the contexts of governing, wisdom, emotional balance, sexual and gender matters, public debate and more. Classes meet Thursday evenings, from 7:15 until minyan. Classes: 11/29, 12/13, 12/20, 3/7, 3/28, 4/11, 5/9, 5/23, 6/6, 6/20.
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Home

A University of California, San Diego professor shut up a Muslim student organization member (affiliated with the Muslim Brotherhood) and revealed her true anti-Israel stance. Many of us are not aware of how radicalized some of our American Muslim students are. Watch the video HERE.

A professor at the University of Michigan refused to recommend student study in Israel, not because of the academic flaws of the student but because of the supposed "flaws" of the Jewish State and his BDS pledge. Please read and let the U of M administration know your opinion, HERE.

U.S.-born Ari Fuld, a well-known Israel advocate and activist was stabbed to death 9/16 by a Palestinian terrorist outside a West Bank shopping mall. A friend of Rabbi Ian's brother, who lived on the same street in Beit Shamesh, Fuld was a hero to all. Read a letter to the editor of the Jerusalem Post, expaining this random killing, HERE.

Read why Israel should have the Nation-State law, HERE.

The Israel Group, a non-profit fighting BDS, is demanding that the LA school district cease holding workshops promoting BDS and discrimination against Israel. The group publicized their findings of the 2017 workshop, finding that the material presented was a one-sided official condemnation of core Jewish religious beliefs and right of self-determination. Read about it HERE.

UCLA will host the Students for Justice in Palestine annual conference in November, whose mission is to "remind us that Zionism is not an insurmountable force...We can have hope that Zionism... can be destroyed." This rhetoric contributes to hostile and violent attitudes toward Jewish students on campuses throughout the US. Sign a petition demanding that UCLA adhere to its commitment to "mutual respect, equality and inclusion," and halt its compliance in fueling anti-Semitism in college settings, HERE.

Why are Palestinian refugees different from aother refugees? Read about the lunacy of the UNRWA HERE.

Watch a short and effective video about Hamas, painting a not-so-pretty picture for Palestinian inhabitants, HERE.

Urge your congressman to vote for the US-Israel Security Assistance Authorization Act, ensuring Israel has the means necessary to defend itself HERE.

Linda Sarsour warned Muslims against "humanizing" Israelis. Read about her speech at ISNA HERE.

Read an article by Rabbi Marc Gellman of the GodSquad on the mystery of blessings, HERE.

Read the latest article from Cold Spring Harbor's Judy Davis, " Has Israel Betrayed American Jews?" HERE.

CAIR, the Council of American Islamic Relations, has published its 2018 Civil Rights Report, finding an increase in Islamophobic incidents across the US. Ironically, the author of the report is herself a conspiracy bigot and anti-Semite. Read about it HERE.

Is British Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn an anti-Semite? Seems so... Read the evidence HERE.

Israeli PM Bibi Netanyahu recently visited his ancestral home of Vilna, Lithuania with his wife, and reflected on his visit HERE.

 Although some argue that Jews are the alien population to Palestine, implanted by the British, in fact, Jews are the indigenous population in this area based on historical and genetic documentation. It is the Palestinians, however, who are there as a result of converts from those indigenous pre-modern Jews and Christians who submitted to Islam, Muslim invaders, and Arab immigrants. Read about it HERE. 

Learn the proper protocol to handle Palestinian activists on campuses as exemplified by Georgetown University HERE.

A video about all the wonderful aid Israel provides worldwide, that will bring a tear to your eyes HERE. 

Buy Chai, Double Chai and larger multiples–– now available for gift purchase


(Click HERE to purchase)

 

Leadership

  • Ian Silverman, Rabbi
  • Frank Brecher, ENJC President
  • A Minyan Plea from Rabbi Silverman

View current news articles, commentary, videos and more having an impact on Jewish culture, politics and religion at Rabbi Silverman's Sites to See
J
oin us for our Tu B'
Shvat Seder

On the 15th of Shvat, we have the privilege of celebrating the holiday of Tu B’Shvat, the New Year of Trees. Traditionally, Tu B’Shvat marks the date at which the earliest blooming trees of Israel, the almond, or shkediah trees, begin their new fruit-bearing cycle, with sap beginning to rise and buds to appear. (Halacha instructs that a tree must be four years old before one can dedicate its fruits and then consume them.) The Kabbalists of Northern Israel established a “seder,” in which trees and fruits, which the rabbis associated with the Jewish people and the Land of Israel, were celebrated. As of the last century, Tu B’Shvat became connected with development and expansion of Israel’s forests and the greening of the semi-arid slopes of the Judaean Hills. Note that what is a fiscal legal holiday has been transformed into a more general celebration of nature.

Many today are of the opinion that we must broaden the significance of Tu B’Shvat beyond its current
Israel-centric scope. We surely must continue a glorification of the natural habitat of Israel. And certainly the holiday takes on even greater cogency in view of the recent arson attacks on natural conservations and farmlands in the South, with acres of land going up in smoke from the incendiary “kite” and balloon bombs flown into Israel by Hamas terrorists. But Tu B’Shvat should encompass a broader agenda.

A recent report by the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and by our own Federal Government is alarming. The citizens of this planet are doing damage that will soon be irreversible, if not lessened and checked in the next decade. I used to think these warnings sounded a lot like Chicken Little. However, it appears that all of us need to understand the gravity of these reports. Oil spills and the dumping of plastic and debris in our oceans threatens our marine life. The run-off of fertilizer into our waters has resulted in brown tides and the blanching of coral reefs, which is killing off even more sea life. The carbon dioxide emissions of industrial nations (China and our United States) will raise ocean temperatures another 2 degrees by the year 2050, causing massive coastal damage due to flooding. And our Federal Government is wrestling with itself policy-wise, as many in the EPA and Trump Administration are unwilling to implement policies that should be dictated by their own scientific findings.

Rabbi Yohanan, in the Talmud, said that if the Messiah comes while you are planting a tree, you should first finish planting and then go out and greet the Messiah. This is because neither God nor the Messiah will rescue us from ourselves. In a midrash, God says to Adam in the garden “Keep it and tend it, because if you ruin it, there will be none to repair it.” Safeguarding nature is our task and our task alone. Our agricultural laws, in the book of Leviticus, stress again and again that we are tenants on God’s good earth, and we have an obligation to prevent it from exhausting itself. Let us utilize the consciousness of Tu B’Shvat to redouble our efforts on behalf of the environment, not only in our nation but in the Land of Israel and for the planet as whole. Recycle with a vengeance. Plant trees in Israel and in your back yard. Consider purchasing electric cars and solar for your homes. And, make sure to reinforce your thinking and spirit with our annual Tu B’Shvat Seder, which this year will be January 18th, immediately after services. You and your children are invited to enjoy the fruits and grains once again, and to reflect on our precious natural elements.

Read More

Last month we evaluated the significance of events at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh and mourned the loss of our fellow Jews engaged in prayer. Naturally, we turn to our own synagogue and ask questions of ourselves. "What are we doing to protect ourselves from a similar attack?" "Am I safe at ENJC?"

Of course these are the right questions to ask. For those who attended the rally at the Dix Hills Jewish Center, you heard the Suffolk County Police Commissioner discuss a program called SHIELD, Suffolk County Police Department's Counter-Terrorism and Anti-Crime program. Over the past two years, Rabbi Silverman and members of our Security Committee have attended Suffolk County Police Department's "Safety in the Sanctuary" active shooter seminar. Based on this seminar, with visits by Suffolk Police Department's Counter Terrorism Liaison to the ENJC and our own initiatives, we have taken a number of steps to enhance the security in and around the building.

Some of our actions are clearly visible, while others are not. We have added high intensity LED lighting around the exterior of the building–the first phase of our lighting upgrade. We replaced all the classroom doors with steel doors, and we have installed security cameras throughout the building to help us monitor and track suspicious activity. We are in the process of developing a Building Emergency Action Plan to address emergencies that include fires, bomb threats and active shooter situations. Once finalized, portions of the plan will be shared with clergy, staff and ENJC members so that everyone understands their role in various situations.

The one thing we have to recognize is that physical security is not simply a matter of installing locks. Locks only work when properly utilized. In our case, the open door policy, whereby we unlock doors during services and events MUST come to an end. The building can no longer be freely open to anyone that walks onto the property. Although no one wants to wait at the door to be let in, the safety and security of our members and guests must come first. We must be alert when opening doors and be aware of who is coming into the building. Key fobs will be issued to the entire congregation in order to control access to the building. More information will be provided as we move forward with this project.

This past June, members of our Security Committee applied for a grant from the New York State Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Services, and I'm proud to announce that we were successful in our efforts and were awarded a grant to be used to further strengthen our security posture. The effort to utilize the grant will take time as we identify and prioritize the needs of the building and our congregants.

The most important message I can share with you is that you are safe at the ENJC. We have taken a number of steps to enhance safety and will be taking many more in the future. Together, we all play an important role in our safety and security. Meetings will be held to train clergy, staff and congregants in emergency action plans and we will continue to work with the Police Department to increase our security measures and training. As you hear all the time on the news, "If you see something, say something." These words hold true for the ENJC as well. I encourage you to continue asking questions and to offer suggestions. If you'd like to contact our security committee, please email them at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Read More

A Plea to the Congregation from Rabbi: Support Our Minyan and Worship With Us On ShabbatWe Need Everyone To Pitch In

There is an old joke about a young man who walks into the High Holiday Service and is greeted by the usher. The usher asks if he has paid his dues. He replies, “I’m not a member. I’m just here to give my grandfather a message.” After a short reflection, the usher tells him, “Okay but don’t let me catch you praying.”

This is about hoping that we will catch you praying. We want you to pray in our lovely Friday night and Saturday morning Shabbat services, our brief evening weekday and our Sunday morning services. To not pray, you see, is no laughing matter, for you miss something significant by not making prayer a part of your life. You miss helping our synagogue fulfill its basic function to comfort our mourners, and you miss in our communal effort to celebrate the world at large, the Torah and God, each Shabbat.

Rabbi Hana tells us that in the Talmud, the prophet Bilaam, seeing Israel’s true power and majesty, blesses not only the tents and dwellings, but the streams and rivers. Why are streams and rivers part of the description of Israel? To stress that just as streams and rivers purify, so too does Torah study and prayer purify us. But I would add a second element: Just as streams and rivers are the circulatory system of a geographic region, so too is prayer the circulatory system of the Jewish people. Prayer nourishes us and uplifts the spirit. It allows us to move from station to station as the days fly by, and it allows us to mark our journey through the calendar year, from Rosh Hashana to Shavuot and back again. Our minyanim are the pulse of our institution. Prayer is heart work and each of us must keep our communal heart pumping.

Our liturgy offers multiple reasons for prayer: to express gratitude to God, to praise God, to petition Him– Prayer seeks to establish a connection, a dialogue, with the transcendent force we call God. Prayer affords us different things at different times. It can foster a sense of reflection and perspective. It roots us to our ancestors. At other times it offers us a sense of renewal, recommitment and re-involvement. But most of all, we pray for two reasons: 1) To provide the pulse of our Kehilla Kedosha, our Holy Community. In so doing, we take care of the needs of those who are grieving, provide a format to hear a little Torah and to celebrate our children and fellow congregants; and 2) We provide proof to God that our hearts are still open. A midrash tells us that each of our souls is a God’s candle. When we bob up and down while praying, we are mimicking the flickering flame. Show God you are still flickering, in spite of disappointments and failures, in spite of efforts of enemies to crush us, in spite of old habits, in spite of all our heart’s wrestling. God hears the prayers of a broken heart, but also the happy heart. Keep all lines open and relish the heavenly connection, ushering God’s presence as a part of our minyan.

We are in urgent need. We need more effort from every single member. Many of us resolve, each new year, to exercise on a regular basis. In this new year of 2019, exercise your soul muscle on a regular basis too! Let us catch you praying! This year make it your resolution to attend once or more a week, so that our minyanim will be transformed from challenged to a vibrant pulse.

Minyan takes place each weekday at 8:15 pm, at 7:30 pm the first Friday of each month and 8:00 pm on other Friday evenings, at 9:15 am Shabbat morning, and 9:00am on Sundays

Read More

Services

  • This Week
  • Weekly

Week of Monday, December 17

Mon-Thurs, 12/17-12/20
Weekday Minyan – 8:15 pm

Friday, December 21
Evening Shabbat Service – 8:00 pm

Saturday, December 22
Shabbat Morning Service – 9:15 am

Sunday, December 23
Morning Minyan – 9:00 am
Evening Minyan – 8:15 pm

 

 

 

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Monday-Thursday
Weekday Minyan: 8:15 pm

Friday Shabbat Services
8:00 pm (7:30 First Friday of the month)

Saturday Shabbat Services
9:15 am

Sunday Morning Minyan
9:00 am

Sunday Evening Minyan
8:15 pm

Happy Chanukah!

 

Celebrating Chanukah

  • 12/3, Commack Corners

  • 12/3, Commack Corners

  • 12/3, Commack Corners

  • Fire Juggler, 12/3

  • 12/3, Commack Corners

  • Chanukah at the Harbor, Northport, 12/6

  • Chanukah at the Harbor, Northport, 12/6

  • Chanukah at the Harbor, Northport, 12/6

Candlelighting

Contact Us

The East Northport Jewish Center
328 Elwood Road
East Northport, NY, 11731  

Phone: 631-368-6474
Fax: 631-266-2910
Religious School Office: 631-368-0875

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Religious School: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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